Steel Wonders of the World: POSCO Steel Builds the World

POSCO INSIDE

POSCO is proud to supply steel for many of Korea’s most widely recognized buildings. Its steel has also been used to build other steel structures around the globe. Read more to find out where you can see “Steel Wonders of the World,” made from POSCO steel.

Steel has been used in city infrastructure around the world since the development of cities. POSCO supplies steel for many industries, including building and construction. POSCO is proud to produce steel used in some of the most widely recognized buildings locally, as well as around the globe.

 

Korea

International Hub, Incheon International Airport (2014-2015)

Steel Wonders of the World: POSCO Steel Builds the World

Incheon International Airport (ICN), also known as the “Winged City,” is 32 miles from downtown Seoul. ICN is one of Asia’s main airport hubs and one of the twenty busiest airports worldwide by passengers and fourth by cargo (Airport Council International). The ICN terminal complex is one of Korea’s largest buildings, with 44 gates and 16 aircraft stands. The bulk of steel used for construction was supplied by POSCO. 

 

Tallest Building in Korea, Jamsil Lotte World Tower (2012-2015)

Steel Wonders of the World: POSCO Steel Builds the World

With 129 stories total (123 aboveground and six underground), POSCO supplied all 40,000 tons of steel required for the construction of Jamsil Lotte World Tower. Both regular and thermomechanical control processed (TMCP) steel were used in the construction. When complete, it will be the tallest building on the Korean peninsula and the fifth-tallest building in the world.

Knowing the importance of anti-shock capability and high-wind and fire resistance, POSCO worked with contracted partners to propose the use of extra thick plates, high-performance grade steel and 120 mm thick plates. The use of 120 mm thick high-performance grade steel (SM490TMC) is more cost efficient than welding 40 mm and 80 mm thick plates, which was the initial plan. POSCO’s construction proposal also incorporated steel column flat plate structure and steel piping. 

 

Longest Bridge in Korea, Yi Sun-sin Bridge (2012)

Steel Wonders of the World: POSCO Steel Builds the World

The Yi Sun-sin Bridge was opened in 2012, rising 270 m above sea level, and connects Gwangyang and Yeosu. It is the first suspension bridge to be made entirely from Korean state-of-the-art technology and equipment. Covering a distance of 2,260 m, it is the longest bridge in Korea and the fourth longest in the world, even surpassing the length of the Golden Gate Bridge.

The famous bridge is named for the Korean Admiral, Yi Sun-sin who built the world’s first armored, ironclad warship with iron spikes during the Joseon Dynasty. The ship itself has great significance in Korea’s history.

Sometimes recognized as the Lee Sun-shin Bridge, its official name is “Yi Sun-sin Bridge.” The bridge was an Outstanding Structure Award finalist in 2013. 

 

Chief Rail Station of Daegu, Dongdaegu Station (2014-2015)

Dongdaegu Station is now the primary rail station in Daegu, Korea, surpassing Daegu Station. Open in 1962, it services the high-speed KTX rail station, as well as the Seoul metro subway system. 

 

Global

POSCO’s steel is used globally mostly in the auto-manufacturing industry, but is also used in city infrastructure as well. POSCO provided steel used in the Vietnam Vam Cong Bridge (2015) in the Kuwait-Doha Link Bridge (2015).

The Vam Cong Bridge is a 2.97 km cable-stayed bridge across the Hau River in southern Vietnam. With a central span (the distance between towers) of 450 m, it has the second longest central span of all bridges in Vietnam. The Vam Cong Bridge is expected to become a regional landmark.

The Kuwait-Doha Link Bridge connects Kuwait and Qatar, and is made of two parts. POSCO supplied steel for the Doha Link, which connect the Shuwaikh Port with the Doha motorway. It is a marine bridge 13 km long.

 

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